GLUTEN FREE LABELING LAWS -Time to Voice Your Opinion

Hi, Everyone:

I’m back from summer hiatus. I’ll have a knitting update soon, but for now, it is important to begin with this important press release from the Food and Drug Administration:

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today reopened the comment period for its 2007 proposal on labeling foods as “gluten-free.” The agency is also making available a safety assessment of exposure to gluten for people with celiac disease (CD) and invites comment on these additional data.

One of the criteria proposed is that foods bearing the claim cannot contain 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten. The agency based the proposal, in part, on the available methods for gluten detection. The validated methods could not reliably detect the amount of gluten in a food when the level was less than 20 ppm. The threshold of less than 20 ppm also is similar to “gluten-free” labeling standards used by many other countries.

People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, and barley. Celiac disease damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. About 1 percent of the United States population is estimated to have the disease.

“Before finalizing our gluten-free definition, we want up-to-date input from affected consumers, the food industry, and others to help assure that the label strikes the right balance,” said Michael Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods. “We must take into account the need to protect individuals with celiac disease from adverse health consequences while ensuring that food manufacturers can meet the needs of consumers by producing a wide variety of gluten-free foods.”

The proposed rule conforms to the standard set by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in 2008, which requires that foods labeled as “gluten-free” not contain more than 20 ppm gluten. This standard has been adopted in regulations by the 27 countries composing the Commission of European Communities.

The FDA encourages members of the food industry, state and local governments, consumers, and other interested parties to offer comments and suggestions about gluten-free labeling in docket number FDA-2005-N-0404 at www.regulations.gov [note from Lee: see below]. The docket will officially open for comments after noon on Aug 3, 2011 and will remain open for 60 days.

To submit your comments electronically to the docket go to http://www.regulations.gov/#!home
1. Choose “Submit a Comment” from the top task bar
2. Enter the docket number FDA-2005-N-0404 in the “Keyword” space
3. Select “Search”

To submit your comments to the docket by mail, use the following address:

The Division of Dockets Management
HFA-305
Food and Drug Administration
5630 Fishers Lane, Room 1061
Rockville, MD 20852

Include docket number FDA-2005-N-0404 on each page of your written comments.

For more information:

Federal Register Notice (scroll to FDA–temporary link will update when document publishes on Aug. 3):
http://www.ofr.gov/inspection.aspx?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

Gluten-Free Portal (scroll to Gluten-Free):
http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodLabelingGuidanceRegulatoryInformation/Topic-SpecificLabelingInformation/default.htm#gluten

FDA’s Proposed Rule on the Gluten-Free Labeling of Foods: http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodAllergensLabeling/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm077926.htm

Questions and Answers on the Gluten-Free Labeling Proposed Rule:
http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/FoodLabelingGuidanceRegulatoryInformation/Topic-SpecificLabelingInformation/ucm265309.htm

Consumer Update on the Gluten-Free Labeling Proposed Rule:
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm265212.htm

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

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Please spread the word. We need as many people as possible to voice their opinion.

For others’ opinions and more information regarding the labeling law, here are some resources:

Celiac Disease Foundation:
http://www.celiac.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=142:fda-moves-forward-on-gluten-free-labeling-rules&catid=7:news-a-events

Celiac.com:
http://www.celiac.com/search?cx=partner-pub-2870123369516656%3Ae1y9um-mqfh&cof=FORID%3A11&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=labeling+law&siteurl=www.celiac.com%2F#1556

It’s great to be back.

PS: (Added August 14, 2011): Join the Knitting is Gluten Free Blog! You’ll receive updates every time a new page appears (usually once to twice a month) and you’ll be able to leave comments. Feel free to promote your fiber, crafting, or food-related blog, podcast, etc. in your posts. To register, click here.

Hugs to all,
Lee

What do you wish you knew how to knit? Find the BEST, guaranteed knitting and crochet tutorials here. Thank you to Designer Nenah Galati and Knitting Korner for helping support Knitting is Gluten Free.

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry, here: http://www.ravelry.com/groups/knitting-is-gluten-free
Copyright Lee Bernstein, all rights reserved

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4 Responses to GLUTEN FREE LABELING LAWS -Time to Voice Your Opinion

  1. bestbetty says:

    Welcome back, Lee!

    I hope this comes through — I had to go through a log in process to post this time.

  2. 2001 says:

    Lee, I’ve enjoyed reading your blog posts, especially the ones about knitting . . . and Milo cracks me up! I’m fairly new to not eating gluten. You’re right, knitting helps (and crochet and scrapbooking does, too).

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