The Scream

Note:  OhSo Hat information found here.

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This post has been purchased, in a modified version, by Vogue Knitting: Knit Simple Magazine, (one of my favorite knitting magazines) for their Winter, 2013 edition.  It will appear on their Last Stitch page.  Thank you, Knit Simple!

Love to all,

Lee

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8 Responses to The Scream

  1. WonderWhyGal says:

    That was the expression I had when told I couldn’t eat gluten anymore.

    I agree, I don’t like fixing the mistakes in my knitting but I’ve grown enough in my skills to know that if I want to be proud of what I’ve created, I need to do it correctly. I’m even swatching now. I know, I hope you were sitting down for that one too.

    Knitting really does relate to our struggles in life and how we approach them to move on correctly. I wonder if I’m ever in a position to hire an employee again if I could ask knitting questions to relate to how they’d handle a job?

  2. Marcy says:

    What a great punchline! Thanks for the laugh.

    I share that joy of fixing knitting — my greatest successes so far are reknitting a fair-isle yoke to replace one of the colors, and fixing several rows of a short section of a black lace shawl without unknitting more than the affected stitches.

  3. Stitch Lich says:

    Lee, I absolutely LOVED A Return to Love when I first read it in a used book bin more than ten years ago. Over time I forgot about it, and this post brought it back to mind. I was sure Williamson was a modern mystic (and you know now that I think about it, I still may think that!).

    There really is something about bottoming out that gives you a rush, an “everything is f***ed, so what the hell else is there to lose” surge of energy that if nothing else proves that you survived the ordeal.

    The funny thing is, I got a bit of that feeling after being diagnosed with all of my food allergies and intolerances (it helped that I got the news for all of them at once), but I didn’t get that feeling after the despair of my multiple sclerosis diagnosis…that was more of a slow steady climb back up where every single inch of the cliff was scrutinized and studied to make sure I was taking the right way up… Haha, thanks for reminding me. I really should be writing these things down as they happen, I won’t always have other people’s blog posts to jog my memory ;)

    • How wonderful to hear from another Williamson fan!

      I enjoyed your post so much, and I hope you’ll keep in touch to let me know how things are going with you. Best wishes for happiness and good things.

  4. knittynutter says:

    love it, its not just the joy of getting my knitting right, sometimes my life needs frogging too!!

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