What Life is All About

I am home today with an upset stomach — not gluten — more like the flu.

After I left work to come home, I talked to hubby Howard, and he said he hasn’t been feeling all that great either. We are wondering if we ate something yesterday that might be causing the problem.

Anyway, while I am between “bouts,” I have a little time on my hands, so I thought I’d get in a quick post.

On Ravelry, I’ve been having a lovely discussion with my Ravelry friend Linda about being lazy.

Time out: At this point, you need to know that I am a horrible housekeeper. I am a great day-job worker (or I hope so, anyway), but I am not-so-good at daily household tasks once I get home.

Anyway, Linda said something about being lazy, and I commented back to her that she was my type of person . . . and then she wrote back to ask if I was a lazy person, too.

After pondering the question a bit, I answered that all depends on how you define lazy. I like to think of it as being excellent at prioritizing.

The way I look at it: If on the day I die, I am lucky enough to have any semblance of memory left, I won’t remember if I dusted, washed the dishes or straightened the house. What I’ll remember is time spent with family and friends … and knitting.

Not lazy. Smart.

Anyone else out there feel the same way?

(Thanks Linda, for inspiring this. You are a wonderful, NOT-lazy friend.)

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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KARMA

Since my last blog, I’ve had a few mishaps.

First, I’ve been waiting, praying, hoping to hear from Southwest Airlines. On my trip back from Stitches East in October, I left a ton of treasure in the seat pocket:

1- A large project bag filled with countless knitting notions and a stack of Knitting is Gluten Free business cards

2- A binder filled with patterns, errata, project notes, newsletters, yarn labels – all of it affectionately organized in individual document protectors.

After I claimed my luggage in Chicago, I noticed the loss. Distraught and heartsick, I filed a claim right away. To date, nothing has surfaced.

One of three things has happened:

1- Someone has yet to contact me
2- Someone assumed my stuff was worthless and threw it away
3- Someone stole it

What do you think?

My bet is #2, especially since forgotten items are not the airline’s responsibility . . . and if the attendants had watched me knit in flight, they would have seen me grimace after every dropped stitch. Heck, by the end of the flight they might have assumed I wanted to trash the whole thing. Who knows.

One thing for sure: If someone stole my notions, it wasn’t a knitter. Knitters are the most benevolent people in the world, especially when it comes to caring for fellow knitters. A knitter would call or write immediately (info on business cards), and upon returning everything, throw in an extra pattern or two just for fun.

No, my stuff was definitely not stolen. I mean, come on, who other than a knitter would want it?

Oh my gosh . . . I hadn’t thought about this until now . . . but I wonder . . . do you think . . . that maybe there might be a black market for knitting notions? Right now, might some non-knitting-yet-crafty rover be standing in an alleyway, flashing a point protector from behind a trench coat?

I hope so. At at least it would mean someone understood the value of it all.

Next . . .

As moths in Indiana have a way of diminishing in winter, Milo the Moth Hunting Dachshund has taken to eating wool instead.

That’s right. Wool.

And not just any wool. Finished projects.

As an appetizer, he chose the second side slip cloche I’ve made. The pattern is from the hat on cover of Boutique Knits, by Laura Irwin:

Boutique Knits by Laura Irwin, Interweave Press

This time, I knit it in Ella Rae Classic wool in a plum colorway (113). It was going to be for me, but it looked as good on daughter Michelle as the first one I knit for her (Dale Baby Ull Merino, gray 0007, with Filatura Di Crosa Fancy, colorway 36):

. . . so while she was home for the holidays, I gave her the second cloche, too.

Without realizing the danger, she left her new hat unattended, and Milo being the artful dodger he is, helped himself to flippy, flapper part. He did minimal damage, but the whole thing still needed to be frogged to get to it.

(For my non-knitting friends out there, frogging means “rip it, rip it, rip it.”)

I came up with an idea: Felt it, just a little to lock in the stitches, then trim the flap!

I left it in the washing machine too long. For the record, this yarn felts beautifully.

Bye-bye, boutique hat. Hello, felted bowl.

Next . . .

Milo frogged my Supreme Possum Merino Mittens.

This time, it looked as though Milo was attacking more than snacking. Perhaps he thought the mittens were badgers.

I loved those mittens beyond belief. For someone with Raynaud’s Syndrome (me), possum is a perfect fiber. They were oh, oh, oh so incredibly soft and warm (notes here), and also the first mittens I made. I was proud of them, and I miss them.

Sigh.

You know, the more I think about it: It must be karma.

Remember back when I got so gosh darn excited about Milo eating moths? Well, I think maybe the universe is getting even with me for enjoying it so much.

You see, I have always been one of those people who puts spiders outside instead of killing them . . . and as silly as it may sound, I have driven more than one house mouse to an ever-so-distant woodland to grant it a new home.

Truth be told, if given the opportunity I would probably want to rescue a tapeworm.

Yep. Karma. I mean, think about it: Moths eat wool (what makes this even worse is that I’ve since learned that not all moths eat wool) . . .

. . . and Milo eats moths . . .

. . . and then I go all online and everything to flaunt it all . . .

. . . and now . . . Milo eats wool while I suffer in a shot framed in what feels-all-the-world like an Ed Wood movie:

REVENGE OF THE MOTHS

Come to think of it, the possum might be getting his digs in, too.

Sometimes, I think about how life might have been so much easier if I could just eat wheat.

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Sock Enters The Deathly Hallows

Sunday, November 28, Crack of Dawn: This morning begins as a quiet and beautiful one. I wake to a pink sunrise, laced with anticipation in knowing that Howard and I will see the latest Harry Potter film this afternoon.

I reflect on the day ahead. I think about how I will bring some knitting with me to the theater. Not Howard’s socks (I’m on the second one!), but instead the cotton, garter stitch shawl I started when I was first learning how to knit.

The shawl is for my niece Chrissy, who has been waiting for it forever. I save the shawl for times that call for mindless knitting: Prayer. Meditation. Phone conversations. Movie theaters. OR, when I’m so frustrated with something that if I don’t grab knitting, I’ll put my fist through a wall.

You know what? That fist feeling hasn’t to me happened in a long time now.

For those of you who follow my gluten-free gallivanting, you know that one of the side effects of being seriously glutened (at least for me) is becoming cranky, micro-managerial, overly sensitive . . .

I become a bitch.

So knitting has become one of my best friends. It calms me. It challenges me. It comforts me. It waits for me. It forgives me when I mess up. It helps me overcome my most bitchy, glutened moments.

Knitting also keeps me from feeling sorry for myself. When I cannot eat what I want, I turn to my best friend.

The food thing has become even more challenging as of late.

I was recently told that, in addition to gluten-intolerance, I am also sensitive to corn . . .

Movie theater.

Popcorn.

Movie theater.

Popcorn.

Movie theater.

Popcorn.

Normally, I would have written the above copy like this:

MovietheaterpopcornMovietheaterpopcornMovietheaterpopcorn . . .

Instead, I wrote Movie theater and Popcorn separately with a period after each, because for the first time in my life, I now have to keep movie theaters and popcorn separated. Period.

I can’t help but wonder if this is the way the dark lords of corn seek revenge for my having smuggled homemade popcorn into movie theaters for, like, EVER.

You can see why bringing my best friend into the movie theater is important to me.

Non-knitters will ask, “How can you knit in the dark?”

I will answer: “Are you kidding? How can I not? It’s survival mechanism . . .”

Back to the beautiful day . . .

I wake up early and make a pot of tea, which I’ve been inspired to drink again instead of coffee, thanks to a recent blog post by Stephanie Pearl McPhee a/k/a the Yarn Harlot, who is a hero of mine and, good grief, I’ve now mentioned her in so many of my blog posts that I’m beginning to wonder if she is becoming a Saint-of-sorts in my life.

You’ll find The Yarn Harlott blog here.

This morning is perfect. Blissful. In addition to working on Howard’s second sock, I listened to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone on unabridged audio. I started the whole series of HP books yesterday. I’ve gone far too long just watching the movies without reading the books. How dare I?

Fast forward to 10:30 A.M. I have been at it for hours now, sitting in the kitchen, knitting, reading, sipping tea, basking in life. Smiling.

Howard peeks his head around the corner and tells me he is going to take a bath.

Howard is hard of hearing. Without hearing aids (not waterproof), he can’t, well, hear. Having to wear hearing aids has been a blessing to Howard at times. When I’ve been glutened, all he has to do is remove them, and he is instantly transported to a land where everything is right, good, silent and peaceful.

I smile and nod in reply, knowing he won’t hear me if I say anything. Then I go back to knitting, reading, sipping, basking and smiling. I start to think: Maybe I have found my own land of silent and peaceful.

Enter Milo-the-Moth-Hunting-Dachshund. Milo is 11 months old and still a puppy. He is also a faster-than-the-fastest dachshund, and (even though I would NEVER race a dog) he could outrun a greyhound if there were a moth at the finish line.

Certain phrases excite Milo. One of them is, “What are you doing?” which, when said in an excited, high-pitched playful-like tone, sets Milo into doing a happy dance with tail wagging, tongue waving, fur flying.

Milo smiles when he does his happy dance. He really does.

For some reason though, Milo is having a mellow morning as well. Curious.

As Howard runs the bath water, Milo paddle-foots his way into the kitchen and kneads his paws up my legs. I lean down and absentmindedly say, “Hi, there, good boy! What are you doing?”

Peppy puppy returns. He bounds straight up to lick me on the face. As he does, he bops me on the nose.

And, this is where it gets interesting:

My hand grabs my nose, my sock yarn dangles and somehow manages to hook itself to Milo’s collar. I have a knee-jerk reaction, which startles Milo, and as Milo backs away, my yarn goes with him.

“Yaauuuuuaaaaauuuugh! Oh Milo no . . .no, no!”

Then, before I fully realized what I was saying, I said it again: “Milo, what are you doing?”

HAPPY DANCE. Prancing puppy, racing, smiling. Go, puppy go. Out the kitchen, into the living room, down the hallway . . .

Over the river and through the woods.

Now, I am running. I am chasing Milo frantically. I really don’t remember what I was saying, but I remember trying to hoot “STOP!” while laughing hysterically and trying not to panic.

Remember my best friend? Well, now that friend is being unmercifully drug through the house and . . .oh NO! Now my yarn is headed dangerously close to a spot where I see Milo had an accident earlier.

I stop laughing. It is at his point where I enter the Deathly Hallows. This happened much earlier in the day than I had anticipated. “STOP! Wait!”

Luckily, I was able to counter the pup at the poop. Phew. But then, Milo sees it, and he sees that I see what he sees, and he immediately takes off running in the other direction.

“Whhaaaa-ah-ah-ah, aughhhhhhh, no, no, NO! Come! Wait. Stay. No, Milo, Milo, wait!”

Meanwhile, Howard bathes in relaxation. For him, everything is silent and peaceful.

. . . back to chaos: As Milo springs happily through the house and I scuttle after him, I realize I can’t stop laughing. A thought comes to mind: Back in glutened days, I would be having a fit, but today I am laughing.

Yes, yarn is everywhere. Yes, my sock is doomed. And as doom looms, I see my life play before me in a culmination of I Love Lucy and Strega Nona.

Eventually Milo jumps on the bed where I somehow manage to dislodge the yarn from his collar despite the pants, wags and waves.

Slowly, I make my way back through the house, rewinding the yarn, rewinding the yarn, rewinding the yarn . . . until it reaches my sock who (yes, who)–and this is unbelievable—remains unscathed.

It seems as though the line of yarn that traveled with Milo flew off of the yarn cake instead of the needles. I am clueless as to how the sock survived all of this.

It is a miracle.

Saint Stephanie, was it you?

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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WHY NOT JUST BUY SOCKS?

Continuing with my previous blog post, hubby’s socks are coming along fine. Here they are so far, looking a bit rough. When I’m done knitting them, a proper blocking will ease them into looking smoother (I hope) . . .

So, the other day, I was talking to a friend who was uneasy about all the work that goes into knitting a pair of plain ol’, white wool, size 13EE socks.

She asked me how much I pay for sock yarn. When I replied that it is not unusual to pay $18 to $20 a skein, she shrieked, “And you still have do to do all the work!? What? Are you nuts? Why not just buy a pair?”

Oh, the pain.

I decided not to tell her that for a men’s size 13EE, I had to buy two skeins.

Sweet hubby Howard, if you are reading this: I’m sorry if you are now lying on the floor in hope of smelling salts.

We don’t have any.

Live with it.

Back to my friend: Her question was not new to me, and for knitters in general, it is far from new. “Why not just buy it” has irked pointy-sticks folks for ages. I was forewarned about it in blogs, conversations and books (Yarn Harlott comes to mind).

Forewarned is forearmed. I wanted to be prepared with an answer.

I had decided the best way to conquer “why not buy cheaper, faster knit stuff” was to explain that knitting is entertainment, which, if you consider the price per hour, makes knitting a bargain.

When the question came this last time, I thought I was ready with an answer . . .

I turned to my friend and said, “Well, how much would you pay for dinner out and a movie? Probably much more than I pay for a skein of sock yarn . . . and how long does your entertainment last? Less than one night? Well, let me tell you, for far less money, I get to entertain myself for . . . for . . . “

Then I stopped. I realized I had no idea how long it takes to knit a pair of socks.

So, I simply said, “. . . for . . . for . . . forever,” which I figured was pretty close to the truth since that’s what knitting a pair of socks feels like.

I vowed to get a better answer.

Off I went to visit Ravelry’s Sock Knitters Anonymous Forum, where I asked fellow sockaholics how many hours it takes them to knit a pair of socks.

The most popular answer seemed to be 20 hours. This might change since the thread is still active. If you are a member of Ravelry, you can find it here.

While I’ve never timed myself, I would guess it takes me around 30 hours, especially since I’m still new to knitting socks. So, let’s figure an average of 25 hours a pair.

With thanks to all my friends on Sock Knitters Anonymous I now have a more definite answer.

Wow! For 20 U.S. dollars, I get 25 hours of fun. That’s 80 cents an hour for pleasure beyond belief, plus it is calorie free, gluten free, etc.

AND I end up with socks that are priceless.

Such a deal.

Your turn: What do you say when someone asks why you don’t buy socks, sweaters, hats, etc. instead of knitting them?

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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SOCK LOVE

Today, I started knitting a pair of white wool socks for my husband Howard. He wears a size 13EE.

In normal (instead of teeny-tiny sock size) stitches, that is roughly the equivalent of knitting a football stadium cozy.

That’s what love will do.

–Lee–

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Stitches East, A Car Collision, A Felted Bag, A Knitting Addiction and More . . .

Wow – so much has happened since I last posted.

First, this:

Do you plan on attending Stitches East in Hartford Connecticut October 28-31, 2010? If so, plan to visit Booth 927. That’s where Knitting Korner’s Nenah Galati will have her space this year . . . and I’ll be working there with her. I’d love it if you’d stop by and say hello.

It is a great pleasure to work with Nenah. I met her after I purchased her SOCK I: How to Knit Socks on Two Circular Needles DVD in July. I had a technical question about playing the DVD, left a generic, general message on what I thought was a standard help line . . . but she personally returned my call the next day (this blew me away).

We started chatting and became fast friends. I’ve been working with her ever since, and I love every minute of it.

My current knitting projects include my making my way through all of Nenah’s instructional DVDs. She has 20 of them, so it is a huge project for me. Right now, I’m knitting my way through How to Knit A Boxy Cardigan and enjoying it.

Nenah’s DVDs have an amazing effect on people. She is just like one of us (albeit a very smart one of us), with a calming, down-to-earth, nurturing personality. I love how she makes knitting or crochet mistakes, admits it and just lets the camera keep rolling as she corrects. This makes Nenah very Julia Child-like in the way she instructs—sensible yet confident, with an “Oh what the heck, you’re human, fix the darn thing and keep filming” attitude, which is endearing.

Nenah even includes her outtakes at the end of each DVD. Make sure you go to the bathroom first to spare having an accident as you watch and laugh.

Speaking of accidents, next story . . .

Ask me what’s new. This is what’s new:

A few weeks back, Howard and I were stopped at a light on U.S. Highway 30 in Merrillville, Indiana, and we were rear-ended by a gal going an estimated 40+ miles per hour.

Everyone walked away from the accident, which is the only thing that matters. At first, I was quite accepting of the accident despite our car being totaled . . . but that’s not the story. This story is about how I learned just how unfathomable my addiction to knitting has become.

See the trunk? The collision smashed it to where it couldn’t be opened at the scene, so it had to be towed full of whatever stuff was in there.

My brain scrambled to remember. We were on our way to a bring-your-own-lawn-chair birthday party, so there two new lawn chairs in there. I remembered there were also some CDs, a few books, including my gluten-free grocery store guide, a gallon of windshield wiper fluid, and countless reusable, canvas shopping bags. It is my ritual to carry a ridiculously large stack of those bags everywhere with me, so when I shop, I can forget to bring them into the store.

No big loss.

Then, just as I had reconciled it all; just as I was giving myself a mental hug for not freaking out over the accident having happened; just as the tow truck slowly pulled away as Howard and I were waving good-bye to our grand, old car . . . I remembered I HAD A KNITTING PROJECT IN THE TRUCK.

Holy crap.

It was my first attempt at a felted bag—a Noni Nomad Hobo felted bag, thank you very much, for which I paid major big bucks because I broke down and bought a month’s worth of knitting classes to go along with it . . . and don’t let that used Cadillac fool you, I don’t have major big bucks.

Besides, if you know anything about purchasing knitting lessons, purse hardware, and endless yards of yarn, then you know that I paid far more for the purse than I did for the car.

Noni's Photo of Nomad Hobo Bags

Panic time. This was on a busy highway. As I flailed and wailed, gapers gathered.

What the heck are you looking at? Don’t you understand? That purse took me forever to knit, and when I finished it, it had felted beautifully! It was cute! It was plump! And it had the most perfect, little bottom . . . and now my baby is being carried away in the trampled trunk of a compressed car! SHUT UP! STOP STARING! Go away.

I mean, after all, who in the same situation wouldn’t squawk at gawkers? It’s not as though such things as knitting projects could ever be replaced. Each stitch is precious, priceless, and a perfect work of art. Each project is a masterpiece, and each . . .

Okay. Wait. Hold on a minute.

First, I may be exaggerating this story a bit (except for the price of the purse). And much, if not all, of the panic I felt may have played out in my head rather than on the street. Yet either way, it was at that moment I realized my addiction to knitting had whorled out of control.

I stopped to take pause and to reflect on my attitude. Good grief, where was my mind at?

Of course felted bags can be replaced. Of course they can, of course they can, of course they can. I knew that. I really did.

Further more, only life is precious, not knitting, and only the cosmos is priceless, not knitting . . . and only love is a perfect work of art, not knitting.

Deep breath. Okay. Right.

That was then.

This is now: I’m still addicted to knitting, and I’m damn glad the junkyard was able to pry open the trunk and give me purse back!

This is one bag I’ll remember to carry with me into the store.

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Is There a Cure for Autoimmune Disease?

“Isabel, a cute 10-year-old girl from Texas who loved riding horses, walked into my office a year and a half ago with one of the most severe cases of autoimmune disease I had ever seen. Her face was swollen, her skin was inflamed, her joints were swollen, her immune system was attacking her entire body–her muscles, her skin, her joints, her blood vessels, her liver, and her white and red blood cells. Isabel couldn’t squeeze her hand or make a fist. The tips of her fingers and toes were always cold from Raynaud’s disease that inflammed her blood vessels. She was tired and miserable and was losing her hair. Isabel was on elephant doses of intravenous steroids every three weeks just to keep her alive, and she was taking prednisone, aspirin, acid blockers, and methotrexate, a chemotherapy drug used to shut down the immune system daily . . .”

So begins an article in the October 10, 2010 Huffington Post: “Is There a Cure for Autoimmune Disease,” by Mark Hyman, M.D. Many members here will find this article interesting, thought-provoking and –depending on who reads it–anything from frustrating to inspiring.

If you scroll down after the article, there are a number of Huffington readers’ posts in response to the piece. You might find these of use, too.

What are your thoughts on this article? Do you have links to other articles of interest you’d like to share? When you have a moment, please share you thoughts with us here.

My thoughts: Dr. Hyman can be quite a marketer at times, but he also has interesting information that’s worth referencing if only to lead you on a journey to other articles and information. Dr. Hyman is also an author and has written many books on health, one of the most popular being The UltraMind Solution: The Simple Way to Defeat Depression, Overcome Anxiety, and Sharpen Your Mind. Suggestion: Read them from the library before purchasing.

More great information and thoughtful discussions: If you haven’t already, be sure to join our Ravelry Discussion Group at here: http://www.ravelry.com/discuss/knitting-is-gluten-free/topics OH MY GOSH, just wait until you see all the outstanding recipes posted there. Thanks to members’ talents, we have everything from chicken pot pie to onion rings. (Special thanks to FireBear for these two and more.)

UPDATE: Congratulations to AnnaMarie, winner of the contest posted in the last blog. Her name was drawn to win her choice of a Nenah Galati Knitting Korner DVD. AnnaMarie: I’ve emailed you with the details. Thank you (and everyone here) for your comments!

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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What is a Reasonably Intelligent, Squirming, Fidgeting, Wiggly-Butt to Do?

UPDATE: Congratulations to AnnaMarie, whose name was drawn as winner of her choice of a KnittingKorner DVE. AnnaMarie: I’ve emailed you with the details. Thank you (and everyone here) for your comments.
—–

If you have been diagnosed as gluten-intolerant, and if you hope that changing the way you eat will be worth all the fuss and frustration, you’ve come to the right place. I hope this little story will help you keep on keeping on.

On the surface, this is about knitting . . . but it really about how changing foods might spark a change in your behavior.

Project vs. Process: A Love Story

They say there are two types of knitters: Project knitters and process knitters. Most knitters are a little of each, but knitters usually display one trait more than the other.

One is not better than the other. It deals with how you feel about projects and how long they hold your interest.

Project knitters love to get the job done. They like the process of knitting, but they LOVE finishing, gifting, wearing, displaying, posting about it. Completion=gratification.

With process knitters, the thrill lives at the beginning of the project more than the end. Give process knitters anything that allows them to play with a new fiber, technique, or pattern and they’re hyped. Because process=gratification, process knitters can get bored and move onto a second, third . . . hundredth project before they finish anything.

I know process knitters well. Until this year, I was process knitter.

Heck, I was a process everything.

Want proof? I have an unfinished needlepoint sitting in our basement bathroom (yes, the bathroom — don’t ask). I’ve been meaning to move it into safer storage for a while now . . .

It has been sitting there since 1980.

I often wonder why I haven’t moved it.

I want to believe there is a reason for everything, so I have come to the conclusion that perhaps the canvas has a calling. Perhaps it’s been sitting there for over 30 freaking years to remind me of the story of my life.

1. Find project

2. Get excited

3. Start

4. Fall in love

5. Become obsessed

6. Enjoy

7. Get bored

8. Move on

Wow. Looking at this, I just realized that an argument can be made that the same holds true with everything from books to (for others) boyfriends, but that’s for their blog.

Amazingly, since I started eating a gluten-free diet, I’ve changed.

I’m a project knitter now. At age 57, I never thought a dramatic personality change could happen, but it did.

I can’t tell you how many knitting projects I abandoned, B.C. (Before Celiac testing). I lost count.

However, I can tell you exactly how many projects I finished B.C., even though it has been over 40 years since I put my needles down.

I finished two knitting projects. Exactly two.

First, I knit a pair of slippers. I think they were called knit-a-square-then-fold-them-over-and-sew-them-into-slip/and/slide-on-the-linoleum slippers. I made them complete with pom-poms so, when I fell, I could tell which end was up.

Years passed. I started many knitting projects and completed . . . none of them.

Then 1968 hit. It was all about freedom and free-style, so I knit a self-designed, bright red, seed stitch, down-to-past-your-knees-and-way-too-wide-for-anyone boyfriend scarf.

With uneven edges.

It must have been love, because I FINISHED IT!

Well, kind of. The scarf was supposed to have fringe. I never fringed it.

However, seeing as how boyfriend became husband despite scarf, I say it counts.

These two projects were so poorly knit, anyone would want to forget about them. Not I; I cherish the memory. That’s how much knitting meant, and means, to me.

Fast forward to spring 2010. It is now A.D. (After Diagnosis). I have only been knitting for about 4 months. I have finished (or am in the process of finishing) every project I’ve started – ten, count them, TEN projects, as of tonight:

Two doggie coats

A prayer shawl

Two ascots

Two scarves

A sock

Three hats . . .

. . . and more swatches than I ever thought possible. I mention this for those who knit . . . because those who knit know how knitting swatches counts more than anything AND is the last most knitters want to do.

On the needles:

A cardigan – I just started it. I’m almost finished with the back.

That second sock – which I’m really doing! No second sock syndrome, thank goodness. I keep these with me for times when I need something small and easy to grab – waiting for appointments, etc.

A cotton shawl (all garter stitch, so when I talk on the phone I can knit mindlessly).

Almost done:

A felted purse (needs sewing)

I like each project and have little doubt I’ll finish each one. The thought of an unfinished project makes me cringe now. That said, I am sure it is just a matter of time until I land upon a project which I really hate working on. In that case, it may be better to move on.

Life is short. Time will tell.

So what happened? Gluten-free is what happened, and I’m not kidding.

Ask my husband to tell you how long I was able to sit still before going gluten-free. He’ll tell you it wasn’t long—fifteen minutes, maybe, on a good day. As the years passed, I got worse, up until A.D.

More proof?

Okay . . .

Go back to my childhood. Ask any teacher, especially my elementary school teachers, and they’ll put my report cards in front of you—the ones that say I have “potential” if only I could “concentrate, stop talking and SIT STILL.”

Of course, on every report card, it reads as if my behavior was my or my parents’ fault, because in the 50’s and 60’s it was.

Had I been the same child today, I’m sure I would have been put on some sort of medication. This is sad because all I really needed was to start eating the right foods.

My point: If you are a reasonably intelligent squirming, fidgeting, wiggly-butt who’s recently been diagnosed as being gluten-intolerant . . . hang in there! If you’re like many of us, living inside you is the real you—the one who’s been waiting to be born, regardless of your age.

I must add: When it comes to sticking to a knitting project, learning from the worldwide, lovable knitting community helps, as does learning from local yarn shops and using Nenah Galati’s knitting DVDs.

I’ve learned that books and patterns alone don’t do it for me, at least not yet. I learn best if my instructions are visual, tactile, and auditory, and if it is all three at the same time, so much the better.

Having a kind and caring person demonstrate things as I knit helps so much. Perhaps that’s why so many old-school learners—those who learned from an experienced friend or relative—stuck with it and learned best.

In conclusion: These days, as much as I love starting something new, the idea of finishing a project is what excites me the most. For me, the feeling of knowing I can do it is gratifying beyond belief.

Few things beat sitting still and staying there, right beside my knitting, as though it were a best friend.

Because it is.

Love,
Lee

Copyright 2010, Lee Bernstein. All rights reserved.

Contest: Chose any or all of the following questions and answer them in the comment section, below.

On October 9, a random winner will be chosen to receive one of Nenah Galati’s How-To Knit / Crochet DVDs. If you’re the winner, you’ll pick which DVD you’d like.

UPDATE: Congratulations to AnnaMarie, whose name was drawn as winner of her choice of a Nenah Galati Knitting Korner DVD. AnnaMarie: I’ve emailed you with the details. Thank you (and everyone here) for your comments!

Everyone else, even though the contest deadline has passed, we’d still love to hear from you. Please keep posting!

Questions:

Are you a project knitter or a pattern knitter, and how do you know?

Has eating a gluten-free diet changed the way you manage projects? What difference have you noticed?

What method of learning works best for you?

Good luck!

Lee
Some fun links . . .

Join the Ravelry Knitting is Gluten Free Forum here: http://www.ravelry.com/groups/knitting-is-gluten-free.com


If you would like email notification when a new blog post appears, please email your request to knittingisglutenfree@yahoo.com

Copyright 2010, Lee Bernstein – All Rights Reserved

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Hero: MILO THE MOTH HUNTING DACHSHUND

OUR HERO

Such a sweet photo of our newest Dachshund, Milo . . . but do not let his soft, long-haired-red-sabled-demeanor fool you.

Underneath there lives a dog of steel.

He’s a bird (well, no . . . actually, he’s a dachshund)

He’s a plane (well, no . . . actually, he’s a dachshund).

He’s Superdog! (Yes, he really IS Superdog).

By day, Milo is an undercover pup. At night, he defends the knitting world against attacks on wool.

It all began a little over a week ago . . .

It was dusk. Milo was quietly sitting by the sliding glass kitchen door.

As I opened the door to let him out, there came a flash of marvel (also known as the porch light), as the world shone down upon Milo to illuminate his enemies and reveal Milo’s true self.

Moths. They were everywhere, desending upon our house in numbers larger than I’ve noticed in a lifetime. It was as though the buggers knew I had taken up knitting again . . . and they knew the house held the treasure of a delicious, ever-growing stash of wool.

I gasped and, as I flailed my arms like a . . . well, like a crazy woman flailing her arms, I knew my wool and I were doomed.

But then, just when the night looked darkest . . .

Milo spots the bad guys . . .

He jumps! He bounds!

He snaps! He chews!

He swallows.

Faster than a speeding bullet

More powerful than a locomotive

Able to leap sliding glass doors in a single bound

My hero.

Moth hunting has since become Milo’s mission. At the first sight of one, he runs into his booth (also known as the kitchen curtain which feels like a cape). Then, upon my opening the door . . . he emerges, transformed into into MILO THE MOTH HUNTING DACHSHUND!

WHOO-HOO!

Don’t tell me miracles don’t happen.

Today, the 21st day of September, 2010, I’m naming Milo the official mascot of Knitting is Gluten Free.

Okay, all fans of Knitting is Gluten Free, all together now:

ALL HAIL MILO THE MOTH HUNTING DACHSHUND!

Everyone else, kindly keep your kryptonite to yourself.

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Can Knitting Change Your Life?

Daughter Michelle Loving Her Prayer Shawl, Spring 2010

Today’s blog post isn’t about eating gluten free nearly as much as it is about how knitting can change your life for the better.

However, for those who may be new here, I’ll give a little of my gluten free background . . .

In September of 2009, I was diagnosed with acute gluten-intolerance. Transitioning to a gluten-free lifestyle was difficult for me (see my earlier posts for more info), and I found myself feeling sorry for myself most of the time.

I also became obsessed with complaining about living gluten free. I drove people crazy.

Truth be told, I had been on a negativity binge for quite a while, long before being diagnosed. This was against-the-grain for me (pun intended), because I am one of those gals who deeply believes that positive feelings bring positive results while negative feelings bring negative results.

Negativity hurts. And it keeps hurting until you come to the realization that happiness is a whole lot easier and a lot more fun.

So then, why was I living on the dark side?

Gluten had a lot to do with it. I didn’t know it yet, but eating gluten made me feel low, lethargic and lost. Like others who feel the symptoms, my neuropathy, body aches, brain fog, gastro issues and (for me) weight gain, really brought me down.

And when you’re down, you start to think negatively . . .

. . . and, after a while, thinking negatively becomes a habit . . .

. . . and then the habit attracts more negativity . . . and so it goes.

(That and sometimes it’s just easier to be a bitch.)

I won’t bore you with all the things that were going on in my life at the time. What matters: I came to the realization that I needed to attract more positive energy into my life.

Okay . . . fast forward to last spring. My husband Howard and I were planning a trip to New Mexico to visit our oldest daughter, Michelle (pictured above).

New Mexican food is my favorite food in the world, but New Mexico can put you to task when it comes to finding restaurants that understand gluten free food preparation.

At first, I thought I should expect everyone on the trip to go along with where I could eat and what I could do . . . but that was my ego speaking, and ego-speak is the same as it’s-all-about-me-speak, and in my world, it’s-all-about-me-speak doesn’t attract positive energy.

I needed to find something to keep myself happy while others did what they wanted to do.

For those who will write to me to remind me that a lot of Mexican and New Mexican food is gluten free: I am so hyper sensitive that even pure corn tortillas and store-bought beans cause reactions in me, unless they are Certified Gluten Free.

So, I decided to handle the problem the old-fashioned way. I prayed for guidance and asked to be shown how to get over my pity party.

Then, a few days later, it just hit . . . KNIT!

It came out of nowhere. For the life of me, I can’t remember what made knitting cross my mind.

Wanting to knit didn’t make any sense—none whatsoever. Neurological problems caused my hands to be numb much of the time, and when they weren’t numb, they hurt like the devil.

Knitting was the last thing I wanted to do.

And even though I loved knitting years back, I was never good at it. I wasn’t even semi-good at it. I failed at most projects, and failing doesn’t feel good.

Yet, something in my gut kept pushing me to knit. It was strong and wouldn’t let go. Despite all the reasons to the contrary, the thought of knitting again excited me and made me bubble up inside.

Then I read about how the act of knitting is a lot like meditation. The philosophy behind this is something along the line of if-knitting-is-a-simultaneous-right-and-left-brain-coordination-sort-of-thing, then it is difficult, if not impossible, to knit and worry at the same time.

Sounded good to me.

Next, I looked for a beginner’s project to take with me to New Mexico—something to give to Michelle.

A garter stitch prayer shawl pattern practically fell in my lap.

Sounded good to me.

Next, I read about how there are all these knitters out there, all over the world, who use prayer shawl knitting as positive time to either pray, chant, or think only positive thoughts.

Sounded good to me.

So, I set out to knit with only one rule: I would allow myself to knit only as long as I thought positive thoughts . . . and they had to be HONEST positive thoughts.

How long can you go without thinking a negative thought?

Have you ever looked at it?

Have you ever timed yourself?

For me, it was a minute or two, max.

And positive affirmations don’t work for me, either. Unless I honestly believe what I’m saying and honestly feel fantastic as I say it, it’s a lot like dunking a turd into whipping cream while expecting dessert.

So, the moment a negative thought would enter my mind, I’d start knitting more “religiously,” chanting something, anything positive.

After a few weeks of knitting positive, good thoughts became a habit again.

Good grief, they had to! I became so freaking addicted to knitting, I spent every free moment I had doing it.

Ask me if my house is clean. (Ask me if it ever was.)

I began taking my knitting everywhere, including casual parties – you know, the ones where everyone sits around eating . . . and eating . . . and eating ALL NIGHT . . . and none of it is gluten free . . . those parties where self-pity starts to creep in?

Knit, knit, knit, knit, knit!

I didn’t care if I looked silly knitting while everyone else ate, ate, ate, ate, ate.

Knit, knit, knit, knit, knit!

And on the road, and on the phone, and in the airport, and on trying days, in the bathroom-

Knit, knit, knit, knit, knit!

I know you see the happy ending coming, so I’ll keep it short:

Life became a hoot again.

That said, I must tell you that when I screw up a pattern or drop a few stitches (something I do a lot), there are more than a few curse words that make their way into the hoot.

But that’s okay.

Because even though I want to throw the project across the room, it is a positive anger. Does that make sense?

Honest anger isn’t the same as negativity.

I remember when Michelle was a toddler and she tried to run across the street for the first time. I was angry, frustrated, frightened, confused, even guilty . . . but I was so in love with her that, even as I screamed my lungs out, it made it all worthwhile. Michelle learned from it and moved on.

Anger of this sort is not a negative thing. It is a reactive thing.

The same thing is true with screwing up a knitting project. Good, old fashioned, healthy anger and frustration never hurt a soul as long as the soul learns from it and moves on.

I could go on and on about all this positivity stuff, but enough is enough. I’ll end by leaving you with this quotation:

“The act of knitting provides comfort in times when life weighs the most.” — Adrienne Martini (from Sweater Quest, My Year of Knitting Dangerously).

So true, so true.

Now, if I could just get the weight off . . .

Lee
Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Today is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day

September 13 is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day.

There is a good chance you know someone who is gluten-intolerant, but they do not know it. It’s estimated that 1 in around 100 people actually have diagnosable Celiac disease, and many more are gluten intolerant. Sadly, many people are misdiagnosed or they do not know they should seek medical assistance.

Sure Foods Living has an excellent post about gluten-intolerance and celiac disease symptoms here: Symptoms

Please take a moment to read it and ask yourself if you or anyone you know might benefit from learning more. Here in the U.S.A., an excellent resource for assistance is the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America.

A partial list of the symptoms I had are here.

Spread the word, save a life.

Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Knitting Is Gluten Free Now has a Forum on Ravelry

A lot of members here want this blog to be more interactive than it is now. I agree!

I’m happy to report we now have a Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum / Discussion Group on Ravelry.

Just go to Ravelry, sign in, then click on Groups in the tabbed bars at the top of the page, and search for Knitting Is Gluten Free, which will take you to the group portal. Just click on the icon, then click on the “discussion” tab to enter the forum.

You are welcome to upload photos of your projects or yarns, too. This is the perfect way to share what you’re knitting, crocheting, cooking, eating, whatever.

We’re a new forum there, and we already have over 30 members. Please stop by and introduce yourself.

I would guess that most everyone here has heard of Ravelry, but if you’re new to the internet knitting community, let me tell you: Ravelry is awesome.

If you spin, knit, crochet or work with fiber arts in any way, you’ll love it. Warning: Ravelry is addictive.

But then, so is knitting!

You’ll need to register on Ravelry to join. It is free. The community there is warm, friendly and a whole lot of fun.

You can search for patterns, people, projects, yarns, groups . . . hold on. I’m not going to try to explain it all here. It would be like trying to explain Disney World in a word or two. Just go, be amazed and enjoy.

See you there!
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Birth Announcement: My First Sock . . .

Proud Parent of First Born Sock
Name: Opal Rainforest VI Sock Yarn, Color 4007 Furst Kunterbunt – yarn purchased at Sheep’s Clothing, Valparaiso, Indiana
Born: September 5, 2010 at 12:22 P.M. on two size 2 circular needles
Weight: 1.35 ounces
Pattern: SOCK I: How to Knit Socks on Two Circular Needles DVD, by Nenah Galati – Nenah is a friend. I loved this DVD so much!
Labor pains: Minimal

First born photo:

And it fits!

Getting a leg up with Lee

Whew!

Believe me, if I can give birth to a sock, anyone can . . . and it doesn’t even take nine months — more like three weeks. I’m still in awe of how The Yarn Harlot procreated, labored and birthed all in one day (see my earlier blog post). But then, I guess harlots get a lot of practice.

Just between you and me, I’m a little worried about this sock. It’s loud, and it may not sleep through the night. But, just like any new born, it’s soft, warm and cuddly. I won’t mind.

Off to nurse a glass of wine,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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STITCHES MIDWEST 2010: What Would YOU Do If You Were Surrounded by Knitting Heaven For a Day?

There is a God, there is a God, THERE IS A GOD . . .

. . . and God knits!

To prove it, I entered the purly gates of Stitches Midwest last Friday. What a wonderful day . . .

For those who have never been to Stitches Midwest, it is a four-day fiber showcase that features a large vendor market floor, book signings, classes, fashion shows and more. A lengthy explanation would take pages. You must attend to experience it.

I went to Stitches assuming I would buy countless skeins of yarn. Yet, despite falling in love with more yarn than I ever thought possible, I decided to wait.

One reason is because I’ll be at Stitches East in Hartford, Connecticut this October. (More to come about this later.) Since yarn is easy to pack, I used my willpower.

That, and maybe I’ll win the lottery by then.

So, instead, I concentrated on getting my knitting projects organized.

I am not an organized knitter, yet. I am anything but an organized knitter.

But I keep trying.

I have hope.

And thanks to Stitches Midwest, I also have a Diddy, a/k/a The Nantucket Diddy Bagg. (Do you sense a review coming on? Yep . . . I am really impressed with this one, which means I am posting it both on Amazon.com and here.)

I didn’t know I wanted a Diddy. I thought maybe I wanted a few smaller project bags and a carpet bag, but no.

Do you know what it’s like to go shopping, all the while thinking you know what you’re looking for . . . and then you turn a corner . . . and then this thing that you never knew existed sits there flirting with you, and now you want it more than anything else in the world?

Ditto.

Diddy.

I fell in love with it immediately. Here’s why: I usually have 4-6 projects going at one time, and I like to carry as many of them with me as possible, everywhere. That way, I when I screw up one project, I have another . . . and another . . . and another. Fun.

My problem: I don’t have a way to carry everything easily, so I wind up carrying multiple tote bags. Half the time I don’t know which tools are in which bag. It drives me nuts.

Can you relate? If you’re like me, you’ve probably left your car with a project in hand, only to later discover your extra knitting tools were in a different bag . . . OR at the airport, you discover you’ve left something at home. A knitter’s nightmare.

But in my Diddy, I can fit it all: tools, projects, books, notes, glasses, gluten free snacks, dropped stitches—the works.


I can easily carry 3-5 smaller projects in individual project bags (such as socks, hats, gloves) or 1-3 larger projects (long scarf size) or 1 very large project that’s grown to a good size (like a large shawl or afghan), along with notebooks, tools, etc., all organized.

I tell you, I was like a little kid when I got home with this thing. Just for fun, I packed it, unpacked it, and re-packed it again and again, just to see how much I could fit in it and in how many different ways.


Open it to create a tool shelf – having the ability to open it this way also makes it PERFECT for packing in a suitcase.

Zip it into a tote bag with all the tools on the outside (as shown in first Diddy photo, above).


Zip it into a tote bag with all the tools on the inside (this is my preferred way of using the bag).

It is up to you how you’ll carry the bag: It converts to a tote, a roll, or backpack. So far, I’ve used mine as a tote. It carries comfortably in my hand or flung over my shoulder.

This bag is washable; it was designed by a master carpenter, and it is constructed of double thick 600 denier Polyester Canvas, thereby making it a perfect consideration for your estate plan.

I’d write more about the versatility, but since I’ve only had this bag for about a week, I’m still discovering new ways to use it.

If you have a Diddy, I’d welcome hearing your tales.

If you want to see a Diddy and are attending Stitches East this October, The Nantucket Bagg Company will have a booth there. You can also find information about them here.

Or, hey, if you’re in the mood for a county-and-western-Diddy-ditty-twaing-bang-song-thang, go HERE!

Yee haw. There’s nothing like listening to The Crocheting Cowboy sing about his Diddy to get you in the mood for . . . in the mood for . . .

Storage solutions!

knot.

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Overcoming Sock Block: In Praise of The Yarn Harlot, Stephanie Pearl-McPhee

“When I knit on the dark side, I go from Holy to hole, Lee . . . in like, five minutes flat.” ~Lee Bernstein~

As I made my internet rounds before leaving for work this morning, I visited The Yarn Harlot Blog.

Have you heard of The Yarn Harlot (a/k/a Stephanie Pearl-McPhee)? Most knitters have heard of her, but since I am a new knitter, she is new to me.

I am quite a fan of hers.  Stephanie is a remarkable knitter and spinner. She is also a gifted blogger, speaker, author, and more.

Stephanie writes knitting humor. 

Yes, I said knitting humor

I’m serious.  Just read her books, and you’ll get it.  If you knit, I promise you’ll laugh as you read.

My favorite book so far: At Knit’s End: Meditations for Women who Knit Too Much

So, I go to The Yarn Harlot blog today to find that Stephanie has written all about how she just up-and-knit a full-size sock in only one day. She also posted beautiful photos of the finished pair of socks, thereby reminding me that if I don’t get some photos up here soon, I’ll turn into a blogging bore.

You’ll find the blog post here — you’ll need to scroll down until you find the date August 18: http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2010_08.html

As you’ll see if you visit her blog, the yarn she used caused her socks not to match entirely, but that’s another matter.  SHE KNIT A SOCK IN A DAY!  Freaking fabulous.

This raised my appreciation of Stephanie to a whole new level.

Aside from master instructor Nenah Galati (I’ll be writing about her knitting DVDs in a blog to come), I don’t know if this blog has other sock knitters on it. 

Heck, I don’t even know if this blog has any serious readers on it – is there anyone out there today? My stats show that tons of people are looking, but please post a comment so I’ll know if it is true.

Anyway, if you are not a sock knitter, let me tell you: knitting a sock takes some time.

The sock I’m currently working on has almost as many stitches as a oversize prayer shawl I made for my oldest daughter.  (Yeah, yeah, yeah, photo to come.) 

This sock is giving me grief (darn it, yes, photo to come). 

Not because it isn’t enjoyable.

Not because it takes time.

Not for lack of excellent instruction (Nenah taught me). 

Rather, the grief comes from my lack of concentration. 

You see, lately I’ve been knitting at the end of the day, right after I get home from work, before dinner . . . 

That’s my tired, wind-down time, and when I combine knitting with winding down on an empty stomach, I drift into a world where the devil sits on my shoulder and makes me drop stitches.   (Later, he’ll also try to tempt me to eat too much.)

When I knit on the dark side, I go from Holy to hole, Lee . . . in like, five minutes flat.  

Other times, when sock knitting is going more smoothly, it seems as though the sock is taking forever, even when I’m not making mistakes.

Every morning, I wake up looking forward to the time I will spend knitting before the day is over. This morning was different, though. My struggles with my mistakes had me thinking about skipping my sock tonight.

Yarn Harlot to the rescue! Stephanie’s post about knitting a sock in a day reminded me how things in life improve if only a person keeps trying. She gave me the courage to continue. 

You see, Stephanie hasn’t always been able to knit a sock in a day.  In her books, she writes about how knitting can become a black hole where your work never progresses, no matter how much you knit.

How I can relate!

Stephanie: Thank you for knowing me so well. Thank you understanding me. Thank you for becoming such a dear, sweet, personal friend.

Well, no.  Stephanie has no clue who I am, BUT she understands knitters, which means she understands me, and that’s a blessing.

Why? Because Stephanie helps me laugh at my mistakes. 

So, I decided to dedicate tonight’s blog to Stephanie.  I am also thanking her directly, on her blog.  I am writing this to her in response to It’s a bird, it’s a plane, which is her knit-a-sock-in-a-day blog post:

Stephanie,

Thank the heavens, you have given me hope.

My next move: Touch hands to cheeks (the FACE ones) then open palms and raise arms in glory while swinging them around my head like a crazy person, chanting: Praise be to The Yarn Harlot! Note: If I do this in a U.S. southern accent, it will probably work even better.

Okay, Stephanie . . . your post came at just the right time.

For the last stinkin’ week I’ve spent more time knitting backwards than forwards. I don’t know why, but when I turn the heel of a sock, my brain fights me every step of the way.

I mean, for Pete’s sake, knitting a sock is not all THAT darn difficult. All it takes is a little concentration . . . the problem is, there’s a sock devil out there, lurking, smirking and testing my will.

But thanks to you, I now have all good faith that I’ll eventually be able to knit a pair of socks in a month (forget the day thing for now) — and that I’ll knit them forwards, not backwards.

Hallelujah.

Amen. 

Since I’m a strong advocate for paying good things forward, I’m posting this for any fellow stitch droppers out there.  I hope that if you, too, get frustrated with knitting mistakes, you’ll find The Yarn Harlot and learn about the wonderful woman who can make you smile in spite of it all. 

PS:  I know I promised a post about how knitting helped me cope with liviing gluten free.  It’s coming. Right now, though, I’ve been too busy knitting, dropping stitches . . . and laughing about it. 

Off to knit that sock . . .

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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If Six People are Reading this Post, One of them is probably Gluten-Intolerant. News Flash: University of Chicago FREE Celiac Testing and Stitches Midwest

Have you ever wondered if you are gluten intolerant or if you have celiac disease?  The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center will have its annual free blood screening & Ask the Experts Panel on Saturday, October 9, 2010, 8:30 AM to Noon.  This is a very big deal — there is NO CHARGE to be screened.

You are eligible for the Blood Screening if:

You have a close family member that has celiac disease or Type-1 diabetes, or

You have Down Syndrome, or

You have a related autoimmune condition such as rheumatoid arthritis or Addison’s Disease, or

You have digestive problems, chronic fatigue, osteopenia/osteoprosis, or

You have other related symptoms or conditions – visit www.celiacdisease.net for more information.

Preregistration is mandatory.  Registration opened August 15.  You may register by calling 773-702-7593.  You may also visit www.celiacdisease.net for more information. 

Ask the experts is 10:30 – 11:30.  It is open to the public.  Bring your questions for a question and answer session with world-renowned experts in celiac disese.  There will also be an exhibit area for sponsors.  SAMPLES and information will be available beginning at 8:30 AM.

The event will take place at the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine (DCAM) at 5758 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

——–

I’m going to Stitches Midwest this Friday.  I’ll be sure to post photos and news from the knitting world when I return.  If you live in the Midwest and are interested in attending:  http://www.knittinguniverse.com/flash/events/Eventportalmidwest.php

Love to all,
Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: Lee_A_Bernstein
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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Feeling Sorry for Yourself:

If it leads to knitting, maybe it’s a blessing . . .

“Any time anyone works to cope with serious changes in diet, there are emotional stages we all face. We are all in the same family.” ~Lee Bernstein~

(Note: Be sure to visit the knitting and food tips at the end of this blog)

One of the things I’m proudest of in life is losing over 100 pounds. Except for a stubborn 15 pounds, I’ve kept it off for almost 20 years now.

So, when I was told I could no longer eat anything that contained wheat, barley or rye, I said to myself, “That’s okay. I can do this. I’m an expert at overcoming food challenges.”

It was odd. I was relieved. revived even, to learn I had gluten-intolerance. My brain and my body had become so excruciatingly ill from gluten, I was grateful to learn I could heal myself by doing something as simple as giving up certain foods.

Well let me tell you, it wasn’t so easy.

As it turns out, I’m one of those gals so sensitive to gluten that even foods labeled “gluten free” can cause me to have a horrible reaction.

Gluten hides, too. It lurks in everything from flavored coffee to licorice to soy sauce.

One of the biggest challenges was remaining symptomatic after giving up gluten in foods. I learned I had to give up my favorite brands of cosmetics, toothpaste, soap, and hair products. I had to stop using our toaster, convection oven, along with anything plastic, wood, non-stick, cast iron (in this case, perfectly seasoned antique cast iron—that one really hurt). This is just a small, partial list—it went on and on.

Because I am so sensitive, I also get reactions to a lot of packaged foods normally considered gluten-free. The problem is they share facilities or lines with gluten or wheat products.

Cross contamination is a challenge, too, especially in restaurants. Unless the kitchen and wait staff are as conscientious as surgical nurses, contamination can happen.

Let’s say I go to a restaurant and order a salad with vinegar and oil dressing. Salad greens, vinegar and oil are all gluten-free.

However, just prior to cutting a tomato for my salad, the preparer assembled a sandwich for another diner. He wipes his hands afterwards rather than scrubbing or putting on never-used gloves. Or maybe a server—someone who has handled tray after tray of gluten-filled meals—puts a straw in my water without scrubbing or putting on gloves first.

These simple acts can cause cross contamination and cause a reaction that may last, at least for me, up to a week.

It is even more difficult to dine with friends and family in their homes. I can’t even use the same can opener as other people.

So as you can see, all of this going gluten free stuff wasn’t nearly as easy as I thought it would be.

It was time for a pity party.

And so, I set about mourning the loss of food and the loss of having control over it. I became quite angry about it – a typical stage of grief.

In other words, I turned into a bitch.

It stuck me how, in many ways, the feelings I experienced were the same as the feelings anyone feels when they have to deal with food issues—allergies, weight loss, diabetes, whatever.

Any time anyone works to cope with serious changes in diet, there are emotional stages we must all face. We are all in the same family.

My rules might be more stringent than the rules some other people have, but my rules also were much easier than wellness issues faced by countless others.

I needed to get over it.

Knitting to the rescue!

Stay tuned . . . my next post will be about how knitting helped turn my life around.

Tips of the Week:

Knitting: I learned this at Sheep’s Clothing yarn shop in Valparaiso, Indiana.

If you use a long-tail cast on and find yourself wondering how much yarn to use for the tail, take the needle you’ll use and loosely wrap the yarn around the needle—one wrap for every cast on.

If you like, add an inch or two more at the end, just to make sure you’ll have enough. Then, proceed to do a long-tail cast on, making sure that the tail yarn goes around your pointer finger and not your thumb.

The pointer finger uses the most yarn during the long-tail cast on process.

I never knew this. I used to put the tail around my thumb. Consequently, I always end up with a tail longer than the devil . . . and please don’t ask me how many times I’d start knitting the first row (sometimes even the second or third or tenth) with the tail instead of the working yarn (even if I trimmed it). I guess the devil made me do it.

This long-tail cast on tip worked perfectly for me. Try it and let me know if it works for you, too. Feel free to share other cast-on tips, too.

Gluten-Free Tip:

I can’t use most store-packaged dried beans due to processing cross-contamination. Since being diagnosed, I’ve tried to find a source for legumes that are packaged gluten-free.

I found one: NutsOnline.com. They carry wholesale nuts, legumes, whole grains (certified oatmeal and quinoa included), dried fruits and more. Many of the items are GIG (Gluten Intolerance Group of North America) Certified Gluten Free.

Not all of NutsOnline products are certified, but many of them are. Look for the Certified Gluten Free designation in the individual product listing.

Many of their products are also Kosher and/or organic. The prices are reasonable. The more you order, the less you’ll pay in shipping charges. Of course, if you have an allergy to nuts, check with NutsOnline first to see if these items are safe to order.

They also have sample packets available if you like to try a little before you buy a lot.

So far, I’ve used their fava beans, organic quinoa, organic cannellini beans, and their cranberry beans, all without issue. Yipee!

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Welcome to KNITTING IS GLUTEN FREE

August 4, 2010

I’m Lee Bernstein, new blogger on the block.

To learn more about me, click here or on “About Lee Bernstein and KNITTING IS GLUTEN FREE” in the photo, above.

Please be patient with me . . .

1- As I learn how to blog.

2- As I learn how to knit better than I now do.

3- As I use knitting to cope with food issues and living gluten-free.

Please join me! Subscribe clicking “register” in the sidebar to the right, under the Meta column.

You are welcome to post a word or two in the comment box, below. Feel free to let me know what kind of of posts would you enjoy reading here, too.

What I have planned so far:

You find lessons I’ve learned from living gluten-free . . . and lessons I’ve learned from knitting, the first of which is: Knitting helps keep a mind off of food! Knitting isn’t just gluten-free. It’s calorie-free. It’s carb-free. It’s fat-free. It’s casein-free. It’s nut-free. It’s dairy free. It’s corn free. It’s soy free. Most of all, it’s FUN.

If you have issues with anything food-related, you’ll enjoy being here.

Along with all this, you’ll get insights into the stumbling and bumbling of a gal (me) as she tries to blog, knit and follow a healthy gluten-free lifestyle while trying to avoid making mistakes.

Trust me, this will be a challenge for her . . . and because she plans to share it with you, you’ll probably have a few laughs.

So, here it is: KNITTING IS GLUTEN FREE: a blog for people with food issues (weight, allergies, sensitivities) who love to knit, BUT . . .

It is also for anyone who might like to be inspired to knit, whether for the first time or upon returning to needles once abandoned, as I did (see about me).

I’m so excited to be here! (Frankly, I’m a little nervous about it, too.)

But what the heck . . . let’s do it.

Until next time: Knit one, purl two . . . chew!

Lee

Find and write to Lee on Ravelry:
User Name: LeeBernstein
Visit the Knitting Is Gluten Free Forum on Ravelry — GREAT discussions here, including loving support for people with food intolerances . . . and tons of recipes.
Facebook: Fans of Knitting is Gluten Free
Twitter: KnitGlutenFree
LinkedIn: Lee Bernstein

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